Pure - Netflix

22 year old Marnie is not OK. She may just seem quiet to others, but the noise inside her head is relentless. For the last 2031 days, she has been assailed by an incessant barrage of graphic x-rated thoughts that intrude, at the most inopportune of moments, on her day to day life. Whether she's sitting exams at university, waiting at a bus stop or passing strangers on a street, her life is interrupted by irrepressible sexual thoughts. Marnie has no idea what's wrong with her - Is she gay? A sex addict?? A pervert??? Why is she plagued by these mental images and what do they mean? Is that who she really is, deep down?

Pure is painfully human, sharply observed, and outrageously funny adaptation of Rose Bretécher's acclaimed book. It is a moving, warm and truthful exploration of one young woman's search for herself and her very real struggle with mental illness. It explores what it means to be a young woman today, what it means to discover a whole new world. It's about finding new friends, and most importantly, about falling in love.

Pure - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Pure - Pure Land Buddhism - Netflix

Pure Land Buddhism (Chinese: 淨土宗; pinyin: Jìngtǔzōng; Japanese: 浄土仏教 Jōdo bukkyō; Korean: Hangul: 정토종; RR: Jeongto-jong; Vietnamese: Tịnh Độ Tông), also referred to as Amidism in English, is a broad branch of Mahayana Buddhism and one of the most widely practiced traditions of Buddhism in East Asia. Pure Land is a tradition of Buddhist teachings that are focused on the Buddha Amitābha. The three primary texts of the tradition, known as the “Three Pure Land Sutras”, are the Longer Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra (Infinite Life Sutra), Amitayurdhyana Sutra (Contemplation Sutra) and the Shorter Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra (Amitabha Sutra). Pure Land oriented practices and concepts are found within basic Mahāyāna Buddhist cosmology, and form an important component of the Mahāyāna Buddhist traditions of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Vietnam . The term “Pure Land Buddhism” is used to describe both the Pure Land soteriology of Mahayana Buddhism, which may be better understood as “Pure Land traditions” or “Pure Land teachings,” and the separate Pure Land sects that developed in Japan from the work of Hōnen. Pure Land Buddhism is built on the belief that we will never have a world which is not corrupt, so we must strive for re-birth in another plane, referred to as the “Pure Land”.

Pure - Pure Land sutras - Netflix

The three principal Pure Land sūtras are the Longer Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra, Amitayurdhyana Sutra and the Shorter Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra. These sutras describe Amitābha and his Pure Land of Bliss, called Sukhavati. Also related to the Pure Land tradition is the Pratyutpanna Samādhi Sūtra, which gives an early description of the practice of reciting the name of Amitābha as a meditation method, although it does not enumerate any vows of Amitābha or the qualities of Sukhāvatī.

Bodhisattvas hear about the Buddha Amitābha and call him to mind again and again in this land. Because of this calling to mind, they see the Buddha Amitābha. Having seen him they ask him what dharmas it takes to be born in the realm of the Buddha Amitābha. Then the Buddha Amitābha says to these bodhisattvas: “If you wish to come and be born in my realm, you must always call me to mind again and again, you must always keep this thought in mind without letting up, and thus you will succeed in coming to be born in my realm.”

In addition to these sutras, many other Mahāyāna texts also feature Amitābha, and a total of 290 such works have been identified in the Taishō Tripiṭaka. Andrew Skilton writes that the descriptions of Sukhāvatī given in the Sukhāvatīvyūha sūtras suggests that these descriptions were originally used for meditation: "This land, called Sukhāvatī or “blissful,” is described in great detail, in a way that suggests that the sūtras were to be used as guides to visualization meditation, and also gives an impression of a magical world of intense visual and sonorous delight. In the Infinite Life Sutra, Gautama Buddha begins by describing to his attendant Ānanda a past life of the buddha Amitābha. He states that in a past life, Amitābha was once king who renounced his kingdom, and became a monastic bodhisattva named Dharmākara (“Dharma Storehouse”). Under the guidance of the buddha Lokeśvararāja (“World Sovereign King”), innumerable buddha-lands throughout the ten directions were revealed to him. After meditating for five eons as a bodhisattva, he then made a great series of vows to save all sentient beings, and through his great merit, created the realm of Sukhāvatī (“Ultimate Bliss”). This land of Sukhāvatī would later come to be known as the Pure Land (Chinese: 淨土) in Chinese translation.

Pure - References - Netflix

Tagged , ,